13 of the most spectacular photos Planet Earth 2 has given us

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Here's a look at some of the best photographs that Planet Earth 2 has given us.

The David Attenborough narrated documentary has been thrilling audiences on BBC One on Sunday nights with 10 million viewers each week.

Now an official book has been released to accompany the TV series, featuring over 250 breathtaking photographs and stills alongside the stories of the animals that appear in them.

Planet Earth 2 continues Sunday nights at 8PM on BBC One.

 High in the Andes, Mountain Viscacha bask in the warming rays of the early morning sun.  - (C) BBC - Photographer: screen grab
High in the Andes, Mountain Viscacha bask in the warming rays of the early morning sun. - (C) BBC
Planet Earth 2 Picture Elizabeth White - Photographer: Elizabeth White
A hatchling marine iguana sits on the head of an adult at Cape Douglas, on the island of Fernandina. Marine iguanas are unique to the islands of the Galapagos. They are the only lizards to forage algae from the sea – an adaptation to life on a barren, volcanic island. This hatchling is a successful one: in the first few minutes of life, it and its siblings must outrun snakes that attempt to hunt them as they emerge from their nests and make their way to the colony. - (C) BBC NHU/(C)Elizabeth White - Photographer: Elizabeth White
Every year Southern Buller’s albatrosses congregate on Snares Island, South of New Zealand. Returning to the same nests year on year, the males arrive first and await the females. Relationships can last many years and are reinforced by courtship dances.   - (C) BBC NHU/Emma Brennand - Photographer: Emma Brennand
Every year Southern Buller’s albatrosses congregate on Snares Island, South of New Zealand. Returning to the same nests year on year, the males arrive first and await the females. Relationships can last many years and are reinforced by courtship dances. - (C) BBC NHU/Emma Brennand - Photographer: Emma Brennand
A chain of salt lakes, found at over 4000m high in the Andes, provide a safe refuge for flamingo colonies. They gather here to breed, first performing a peculiar parade dance. Whilst the exact rules of the dance remain a mystery to us, it somehow helps them select a mate.   - (C) BBC NHU/ Justin Anderson - Photographer: (C) Justin Anderson
A chain of salt lakes, found at over 4000m high in the Andes, provide a safe refuge for flamingo colonies. They gather here to breed, first performing a peculiar parade dance. Whilst the exact rules of the dance remain a mystery to us, it somehow helps them select a mate. - (C) BBC NHU/ Justin Anderson - Photographer: (C) Justin Anderson
 Cone head cricket in Costa Rica.  - (C) BBC - Photographer: screen grab
Cone head cricket in Costa Rica. - (C) BBC
Because prey is so thin on the ground, desert lions must hunt whatever animals they come across. As giraffe are relatively common here they are an important prey species even though they are large enough to pose a considerable threat to a lion.  - (C) BBC - Photographer: screen grab
Because prey is so thin on the ground, desert lions must hunt whatever animals they come across. As giraffe are relatively common here they are an important prey species even though they are large enough to pose a considerable threat to a lion. - (C) BBC
Planet Earth 2  - (C) BBC NHU/Tom Hugh-Jones  - Photographer: Tom Hugh-Jones
The intense, evolutionary battle‚ between jungle predators and their prey has led to extraordinary examples of camouflage. The leaf tailed Gecko of Madagascar is coloured and textured to mimic the bark of a tree - a disguise so effective that it is almost impossible to spot. - (C) BBC NHU/Tom Hugh-Jones - Photographer: Tom Hugh-Jones
Red-eyed tree frog takes a rest in the Jungles of Costa Rica  - (C) BBC NHU/Emma Napper - Photographer: Emma Napper
Red-eyed tree frog takes a rest in the Jungles of Costa Rica - (C) BBC NHU/Emma Napper - Photographer: Emma Napper
A Jaguar resting in the shade on the riverbank - but still alert for any prey that may pass by. Central Brazil  - (C) BBC NHU/Emma Napper - Photographer: Emma Napper
A Jaguar resting in the shade on the riverbank - but still alert for any prey that may pass by. Central Brazil - (C) BBC NHU/Emma Napper - Photographer: Emma Napper
 Harris hawks can be found throughout much of the Americas, and are prevalent in the cactus deserts of the southern United States. Incredibly they seem completely unfazed by the vicious spines amongst which they must live and hunt.  - (C)  Ed Charles
Harris hawks can be found throughout much of the Americas, and are prevalent in the cactus deserts of the southern United States. Incredibly they seem completely unfazed by the vicious spines amongst which they must live and hunt. - (C) Ed Charles - Photographer: (C) Ed Charles
Sloths are adept swimmers, as this pygmy three-toed sloth demonstrates. Found only on the tiny island of Escudo de Veraguas, Panama, the pygmy sloth is the smallest of all sloth species and is  endangered.  - (C) BBC - Photographer: screen grab
Sloths are adept swimmers, as this pygmy three-toed sloth demonstrates. Found only on the tiny island of Escudo de Veraguas, Panama, the pygmy sloth is the smallest of all sloth species and is endangered. - (C) BBC
Golden eagles patrol large home ranges searching for food or a mate. Their diet is very broad, including mammals, birds, reptiles, fish, amphibians, insects and carrion, allowing them to be the most successful mountain eagle.   - (C) BBC NHU/Emma Brennand  - Photographer: Emma Brennand
Golden eagles patrol large home ranges searching for food or a mate. Their diet is very broad, including mammals, birds, reptiles, fish, amphibians, insects and carrion, allowing them to be the most successful mountain eagle. - (C) BBC NHU/Emma Brennand - Photographer: Emma Brennand
Nubian Ibex live in some of the most inaccesible mountain habitat.  - (C) BBC - Photographer: screen grab
Nubian Ibex live in some of the most inaccesible mountain habitat. - (C) BBC

Planet Earth continues Sunday nights at 8PM on BBC One.

You can pre-order the official Planet Earth Book now.

And you can catch up on previous episodes of the show on BBC iPlayer.

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