Strictly Come Dancing 2016 results met with MORE claims of a fix after shock winner

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Ore Oduba won Strictly Come Dancing 2016 in tonight's results and a lot of people aren't happy.

Outsider Ore took the glitterball in the final this evening, beating favourite Danny Mac.

Ore had topped the judges' scoreboard with two perfect 40s for his trio of routines, but public votes alone decided the winner.

Despite it being solely down to viewers, a lot of those watching still weren't impressed with the result.

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"Ore wins strictly, he works for BBC. Conflict of interest, it's a fix #strictly" one viewer wrote of Ore's victory.

"Never been a clearer fix on #Strictly. Won't be watching anymore. #StrictlyFinal" another viewer declared, seeming to forget that the final meant the series was now over.

A third complained online: "OMG are you kidding me? Danny Mac was in a class of his own. What a classic BBC fix. Shocking."

But not everyone was throwing their toys out of prams.

"People saying it's a fix. Get over it. The best person won! 😃👍🎉 #Strictly" one fan of Ore's wrote.

And an unusually logical Twitter message on the #Strictly stream wrote: "If the winner wasn't your favourite, it doesn't mean FIX, it just means someone else won cos more people voted for them #strictly"

However the BBC hasn't helped itself by refusing to reveal voting figures from the show like ITV do for The X Factor, I'm A Celebrity and Britain's Got Talent.

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The BBC puts the decision down to not wanting to "affect the way that people vote" - although why this is a concern after the series is wrapped up we're not sure.

The BBC state: "We invite you to vote for the dancers that you liked best, based on their performance in each show and during the series. Releasing voting figures could affect the way that people vote, and also have an impact on the participants. We therefore do not disclose the exact voting figures."

Strictly will be back on BBC One next year.

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